Pseudopod 432: The Influence Of Thomas Glittio

by Arthur Staaz.

“The Influence Of Thomas Glittio” is previously unpublished.

ARTHUR STAAZ is a relatively newly published writer. He has been writing for many years, but finally, at mid-life, has decided to get serious about it. In various incarnations, Arthur has been a songwriter, laborer, lawyer, teacher, father, husband, and victim of suppressed unconscious desires. He is fascinated by dark philosophies, the absurdity of human existence, and the black mysticism to be found in a Thomas Ligotti story. He has a blog/web site at by COLD, DARK, EMPTY.

Your reader – Branan Edgens — is a filmmaker living in New York City. He’s currently producing a documentary on Hmong (pronounced Mong) folk-singing and gearing up for his first feature film, SALAX (pronounced Say-lax) a horror/drama in the vampire genre. When not working he can be found somewhere in the woods building a cabin, if you can find him. You can’t. Check out Genetic Films.

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“He felt it immediately. A current that flowed into his body through his eyes as they scanned the page and out through his fingertips as they tapped the keyboard. He was alive, powerful. One might even say meaningful. But certainly not Glittio.

The room around him faded to a shimmering darkness. Objects lost their distinctness, as did he himself. He could not have told you at that point where he ended and the keyboard began, let alone how it was different from the desk upon which it sat or the floor beneath the desk. Even the act of scanning the words in the frayed paperback on his desk called into question for him whether the book was a separate thing from his eyes. All melded together.

The nebulous quality of his perceptions was contrasted by the clarity of his mind. It is as if I am he, he thought. Indeed, he could not tell for certain. And yet these thoughts did not act as a distraction from the task at hand but only served to further focus his mind. No longer just a student in the act of transcribing an author’s work, he in a sense became the author.”

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