Archive for the 'Podcasts' Category
PseudoPod 543: Be Still, My Dear, And Listen

by J. T. Glover

 

“Be Still, My Dear, And Listen” was published in Issue 7 of “Makeout Creek”, a literary magazine based in Richmond, Virginia.

J. T. GLOVER is an academic research librarian by day and lives in Richmond, Virginia, and is originally from Seattle His short fiction published in The Children of Old Leech, The Lovecraft eZine, and Handsome Devil: Stories of Sin and Seduction. His blog can be found at jtglover.com, and it includes links to other publications, some of which can be read for free online.

This week’s reader – Dagny Paul – is a teacher, writer, failed artist, comic book geek, and associate editor/occasional host of Pseudopod. She is guest editor for Pseudopod’s Artemis Rising 3 event in 2017.
She lives in the middle of nowhere, Louisiana. Follow her on Twitter for no good reason @dagnypaul. Listen to her story “There is No Road Through the Woods” on Pseudopod.


Info on Anders Manga’s album (they do our theme music!) can be found here.


Of course we called her “Audrey.” We were sixteen, mad about Sherilyn Fenn, tuned in together every Thursday, and we went to school with a pimply, stinking cow named Audra Horning? What happened was inevitable.

PseudoPod 542: That Only a Mother

by Judith Merril

 

“That Only a Mother” was originally published in Astounding Science Fiction, June 1948. It appears here with appreciation through the assistance of the Virginia Kidd Agency.

JUDITH MERRILL was an American and then Canadian science fiction writer, editor and political activist, and one of the first women to be widely influential in those roles. In her mid-teens, Merril pursued Zionism and Marxism. According to Virginia Kidd’s introduction to The Best of Judith Merril, Ethel Grossman had been a suffragette, was a founder of the women’s Zionist organization Hadassah, and was “a liberated female frustrated at every turn by the world in which she found herself.” Judith Merril began writing professionally, especially short stories about sports, starting in 1945, before publishing her first science-fiction story in 1948. Her story “Dead Center” (1954) is one of only two stories taken from any science fiction or fantasy magazine for the Best American Short Stories volumes edited by Martha Foley in the 1950s. According to science fiction scholar Rob Latham, “throughout the 1950s, Merril, along with fellow SF authors James Blish and Damon Knight had taken the lead in promoting higher literary standards and a greater sense of professionalism within the field.” As an initiator of the New Wave movement, she edited the 1968 anthology England Swings SF. From the mid-1970s until her death, Merril spent much time in the Canadian peace movement, including traveling to Ottawa dressed as a witch in order to hex Parliament for allowing American cruise missile testing over Canada. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA renamed) made Merril its Author Emeritus for 1997 and the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame inducted her in 2013.

This week’s reader – Dagny Paul – is a teacher, writer, failed artist, comic book geek, and associate editor/occasional host of Pseudopod. She is guest editor for Pseudopod’s Artemis Rising 3 event in 2017.

She lives in the middle of nowhere, Louisiana. Follow her on Twitter for no good reason @dagnypaul. Listen to her story “There is No Road Through the Woods” on Pseudopod.


Info on Anders Manga’s album (they do our theme music!) can be found here.


A well-known geneticist, in the medical news, said that it was possible to tell with absolute certainty, at five months, whether the child would be normal, or at least whether the mutation was likely to produce anything freakish. The worst cases, at any rate, could be prevented. Minor mutations, of course, displacements in facial features, or changes in brain structure could not be detected. And there had been some cases recently, of normal embryos with atrophied limbs that did not develop beyond the seventh or eighth month. But, the doctor concluded cheerfully, the worst cases could now be predicted and prevented.

PseudoPod 541: Tessa Told Me

by Rob Kotecki

 

Rob Kotecki

“Tessa Told Me” is a Pseudopod Original. “I always like to say that there’s nothing more terrifying than the human heart.”

ROB KOTECKI is an award-winning writer and filmmaker. His recent horror short, TILLY played at a number of major film festivals and won the Audience Award at the Brooklyn Horror Fest this past year. Later this year, Rob will publish UNCLE GRIMM’S GRAVEYARD RHYMES, a series of sick and twisted nursery rhymes for adults. He can be found on Medium and on Twitter, @arthousepunch. Feel free to visit his production company at Volatile Media.

This week’s reader – Makenzi Newman – is sixteen and lives in Louisiana. This is her second voice-acting job. Makenzi writes her own stories, though has yet to be published. She has another narration coming up on Cast of Wonders!


Info on Anders Manga’s album (they do our theme music!) can be found here.


“She decided to shut her phone off before she did even more damage to her self-respect and offered to play with the kid. Noah wagged his head.

“Tessa says no.”
“Who’s Tessa?”
“She’s nice. She likes you, but she thinks you should go home.”
“Well, too bad for Tessa.” But he merely shrugged and went back to the game.
“She says too bad for you.”
Imaginary friend. Fine. At least the kid’s quiet.”

PseudoPod 062 Replay: Faith in Sips and Bites

We are digging a classic from the vault and reloading it into your queues anew. We hope that it makes you consider diving into our decade of back-catalog.

Michael Chant writes fiction, poetry, and reviews of books, music, and film. His work has appeared in Strange HorizonsTwilight Showcase, Quantum Muse, Electric Wine, The Chiaroscuro, Nocturnal Ooze, and GC Magazine.

Your narrator is the Lich King, Ben Phillips.


If you are reading this, we must’ve done it. I’m going to tell as much as I can. You newspaper people will have to clean up the spelling. Going to have your work cut out for you. Make it pretty for the front page. Crazy thinking something I write is going to be on the front page. That’s the Lord working in His mysterious ways again. Got to type it out. When I write it out longhand it looks like Chinese. Just have to hunt and peck as best I can. Can’t write no more. Hands shake too much. Nerve damage. All of us got it now.


In Kristi Demeester’s novel BENEATH we have a pastor struggling with a crisis of faith, and an investigative journalist endeavoring to subdue shadows of the past to shield from the greater darkness to come. We have an innocent touched by that darkness that wants to catalyze her to transform the world from that which we know to one of Stygian dreaming.

The cover art is phenomenal. Considering our troubled preacher, it evoked feelings like those from Night of the Hunter, particularly the impressive shot of the underwater grave. Does the stone keep her grounded and prevents her from floating away? Is the snake and her faith keeping her connected or tempting her elsewhere? Which is the shackle and which is salvation? Beautifully executed, and perfect for the conflict within.

More about the book at Word Horde.