Author Archive

The Clan Novel Saga: Brujah


Clan Novel: Brujah covers the action of the third phase of the war between the Sabbat and Camarilla, focusing on events between October 14 and November 11 of 1999. It is Book 11 in the original clan novel saga, and was published in April 2000. It was written by Gherbod Fleming, who provided five of the thirteen novels in the set.

The Sabbat is preparing to assault and take over Baltimore. We primarily follow the Brujah Archon, Theo Bell, who leads the patrols and defense teams. His boss, the Brujah Justicar Pascek, shows up to help root out the mole “Lucius” who has been feeding plans to the Sabbat. Through blinds, double-feints, and false information, the treachery and chicanery is cranked to 10 with the revelation of “Lucius” – this ploy is effective, as his identity was hidden from nearly all the characters, not just the reader. (Continue Reading…)

The Clan Novel Saga: Giovanni


Clan Novel: Giovanni covers events that happen between June 20 and November 4, 1999. It is Book 10 in the original clan novel saga, and was published in April 2000. It was written by Justin Achilli, and this is his sole contribution to this saga.

If Tzimisce is the Saw of the series, Giovanni is the 8MM. Tzimisce is full of monster monsters, but this one is full of monsters that could simply be awful humans. This book epitomizes the Black Dog ethos of White Wolf, which was their mature line of supplemental material that was too raw for inclusion in the primary books. They wanted those supplements to have the same feel as a porn mag in an opaque sleeve behind the counter. (Continue Reading…)

THIS IS HORROR AWARD


Greetings from Pseudopod Towers,

We were amazed and honoured to win the first Best Fiction Podcast THIS IS HORROR award two years ago. We were even more amazed and honoured to win it a second time this past year. None of our staff are in the same time zone, we all work day jobs, and we all love creating PseudoPod. To hear that other people love it as much as we do? Day made, forever.

That got us thinking about all the years we’ve worked out of the spotlight and how it felt to have such hard (though rewarding) work go unrecognized. Horror, like it or not, is still a genre with relatively few industry awards. Horror podcasting, even less so. Hard work deserves recognition.

With that in mind, remaining eligible for an award we’ve already won twice isn’t something we want to do.

We’d like to recuse PseudoPod from competition for the next three years. We’ve been in this spotlight, it’s great. Other people need to have that opportunity too. So, instead of being in contention, we’re going to signal boost other deserving podcasts and the finalists. Not just because professional (and slightly squishy) enthusiasm is our raison d’etre, but because a rising tide lifts all boats. Or colossal sleeping gods… Regardless, every boat rises and that’s a good thing and we want to help. And for the next three years, this is one way we can rise up others.

So here’s what we’d like you to do. Before January 14, 2018, go check out the categories for the THIS IS HORROR AWARD and nominate your favorites from 2018. When the finalists are announced, we want you to go check out and vote for the best. Help us shine the spotlight into all the dark and creepy corners of the podosphere.

Sincerely,

Shawn Garrett and Alex Hofelich, co-Editors

Karen Bovenmyer, Assistant Editor

Alasdair Stuart, Host

And all the PseudoPod Tentacles

The Clan Novel Saga: Malkavian


Clan Novel: Malkavian starts with flashbacks to 1788 before primary focus returns after the siege of Atlanta, with activities running from June 22 through October 20, 1999. It is Book 9 in the original clan novel saga, and was published in March 2000. It was written by Stewart Wieck, who also wrote the Toreador novel. My hopes of this book being better than that one were mercilessly crushed early on.

I loved that the modern portion of this book started in Bosnia, reflecting an interesting sign of the times. That chapter of military activity is something that Americans do their best to forget ever happened. It’s fenced out of popular memory as an uncomfortable reminder of tragedies that were debatably mitigated through international actions. With the hindsight of 20 years available, a powerful metaphor could have been developed here. Then again, this author couldn’t even build a metaphor or call back to include the Burning of Atlanta in 1864, so I’ll just stick with my headcanon. (Continue Reading…)