Pseudopod 290: The American Dead

by Jay Lake
“The American Dead” originally appeared in Interzone Issue 203, and was reprinted in several “Year’s Best” volumes, including Stephen Jones’ THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF BEST NEW HORROR Volume 18.

Jay Lake lives in Portland, Oregon, where he works on numerous writing and editing projects. His most recent books are ENDURANCE and KALIMPURA – part of the GREEN series, out in November, 20112 from Tor Books, and LOVE IN THE TIME OF METAL AND FLESH from Prime Books. His short fiction appears regularly in literary and genre markets worldwide. Jay is a past winner of the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and a multiple nominee for the Hugo and World Fantasy Awards. His blog can be found by clicking the link under his name at the by line.

Your reader this week is Roberto Suarez. An avid film lover, Roberto and his co-hosts review movie trailers every week on Trailerclash: The Movie Trailers Podcast, since they no longer have the time or money to go to the movies like they used to. You can find Trailerclash on iTunes, Stitcher, or directly at the link.

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“When he was very young, Pobrecito found a case of magazines, old ones with bright color pictures of men and women without their clothes. Whoever had made the magazines had an astonishing imagination, because in Pobrecito’s experience most people who fucked seemed to do it either with booze or after a lot of screaming and fighting and being held down. There weren’t very many ways he’d ever seen it gone after. The people in these pictures were smiling, mostly, and arranged themselves more carefully than priests arranging a corpse. And they lived in the most astonishing places.

Pobrecito clips or tears the pictures out a few at a time and sells them on the streets of the colonia. He knows the magazines themselves would just be taken from him, before or after a beating, but a kid with a few slips of paper clutched in his hand is nothing. As long as no one looks too closely. But even if he had a pass for the gates, he dares not take them within the walls, for the priests would hang him in the square.

What he loves most about the magazines is not the nudity or the fucking or the strange combinations and arrangements these people found themselves in. No, what he loves is that these are Americans. Beautiful people in beautiful places doing beautiful things together.

“I will be an American some day,” he tells his friend Lucia. They are in the branches of the dying tree, sharing a bottle of pulque and a greasy bowl of fried plantains in the midday heat. Pobrecito has a secret place up there, a hollow in the trunk where he hides most of his treasures. “