Pseudopod 244: Bruise For Bruise


Bruise For Bruise

by Robert Davies


Sometimes there would be something of the mother in the child, and sometimes something of the father; there was always something of the town. Leathery wings sprouted oftentimes, as common as fingers. Fur of every hue. Horns and scales were plentiful, too. Lots of feathers and thorns and glass and steel. Beneath the apple trees and the pine, anatomy was negotiable. Anything was probable. Every now and then, though, the tired wet nurses, long inured to the strange fecundity of flesh, would whistle in awe as they lifted a newborn from the amniotic slime.

Something truly special would be seen.

About the Author

Robert Davies

From Robert’s website:

I write stories about lobster girls and laser beams. Mimetic fiction is for wimps. Raised on a steady diet of weird paperbacks, Infocom games, and comic books, I have always wanted to be a writer (Well, actually, I first wanted to be a dinosaur, but that didn’t work out so well).

When not writing, I like to travel around the world with my wife Sara, searching for the ideal pint and the perfect bookstore.

My stories have appeared in The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror, Mythic Delirium, Weird Tales, InterzoneBlack StaticShroud Magazine, Murky Depths, One Buck Zombies, and Pseudopod. My horror-thriller novella Hiram Grange and the Digital Eucharist is available at Amazon.

Find more by Robert Davies

Elsewhere

About the Narrator

Elizabeth Green

Elizabeth Green as been reading stories for Podcastle through each of her different life changes: including teaching history of science at a liberal arts college, designing knitting patterns, doing freelance graphic design, and now working as the graphic designer for Girl Scouts of Central Texas. On weekends you can find her and her son playing samurai in the Legend of the Five Rings RPG. She lives in Austin, Texas.

Elizabeth read Beth Cato‘s story Beat Softly, My Wings of Steel for PodCastle episode 405 during the 2016 Artemis Rising event.

Find more by Elizabeth Green

Elsewhere