Pseudopod 79: Ice

By Heather Hatch

Read by Elie Hirschman

Johnson looked out at the glistening white expanse, glad for the
barrier between him and the snow covered ice. He noted the research
ship’s position and speed in the log book – along with the calm
emptiness of the Antarctic wasteland – and turned to Ivers, the man at
the radar.

“Still no sign of Dr. Fenton?” Johnson asked.

“Nope. Nothing from Saunders – how much longer are we waiting out here?”

Johnson shrugged. “Captain says another day.”.



This week’s episode sponsored by Audible.com, offering you a free audiobook download of your choice from their selection of over 40,000 titles, for a limited time.


01
February 29th, 2008 7:59 pm

Interesting… I find I had trouble paying attention to everything, though. It took a bit to get to the point, but it wasn’t all that bad. This gets a 7/10 to me, I think.

Way to make us not want to go out on the ice even MORE now!

02
Buck
February 29th, 2008 8:56 pm

Great story! On the contrary, Dom, the pace sets a mood of desolate stillness that presents an important contrast to the sudden violence that it leads up to. The voice acting was nicely done although I feel like the narration tone could have been more rugged.

03
March 1st, 2008 10:46 am

That story was a blast. I want more. Reminded me a bit of Stephen King’s “Librarian Policeman” story from “Four Past Midnight,” maybe combined with modern-day sorcerer tales like those of Jim Butcher. Whatever the combo, I want more stories.

I found it odd how the gun wouldn’t kill the demon-woman, but would kill the creature the demon-woman was feeding. That didn’t really make sense, and threw me off, but other than that, great concept — I would have never thought of a plot where people not only pay exorbitant fees to rent magic books, but that there are people who have to track down those books and bring them back. Brilliant concept, makes me want to gather up those Blockbuster DVDs that have been sitting under my TV for 5 years and get them back, pronto.

04
March 3rd, 2008 2:15 pm

Apparently, even “the mighty Elie Hirschman” can’t guarantee that his first name will be pronounced correctly. Oh well – I thought I had it rough with the “…aln fthya h’yii leng bthy’a mwf’gtme…”

05
David
March 3rd, 2008 2:55 pm

Great story, as a fan of Cthulhu I hope to hear more in tis vein. Great story and reading!

Also, as a fan of Darker Projects I was wondering why the huge gaps between episodes? I’ve been waiting for some activit on Far Horizons and Gothik for months. I was also hoping the Byron Chronicles would continue sometime this year. I realize this isn’t the best forum to ask; but no one answered my emails on this subject.

06
Mari Mitchell
March 4th, 2008 2:42 pm

I thought this was well written and well read. I was really impressed. It has been hard to find podcast of the quality.

I loved the logic, description of the story, making for a great, intelligent and creepy story.

07
March 5th, 2008 9:55 pm

Expertly read, if in more cheerful a tone than one might expect. Loved the story! The twist at the end was subtle: “Did you do this?” “Not more than anyone else. We had theories, but..” A lone cultist didn’t waken Cthulu, it was global warming. Really clever!

08
Spork
March 8th, 2008 4:07 pm

I’m beginning to wonder if pseudopod is trying to kill me by making me fall asleep while driving.

This story was so dreadfully slow and boring. I didn’t even bother with finishing it up.

09
Dreadful, but only as in Boring
March 17th, 2008 3:49 pm

Tip to writer’s friend, if there is no action in the first 10 minutes, write the story backward. ….. Pity, study in underwater arch might have inspired others. How about this, let others cut your work up with a razor before you rewrite it. This should have been a total of 12 minutes. …..

[comment edited to remove ad-hominem-attack fluff. Tip to commenter: comments should concern the story, not a speculative biography of the author]